mostly experiments and side projects
NadeemHaidary_TheArtofFood_FransSnyders.jpg

The Food of Art

The Food of Art analyzes twelve still life masterpieces for their nutritional content. Though the piece is humorous, the data is rich and often indicative of the artist’s economic means. For example, compare the court painter Frans Snyders' 39,851 calorie feast to Vincent Van Gogh’s four meager onions.

Published in Data Flow 2 and exhibited at FutureEverything 2011 in Manchester, England.

  Still Life with Fruit, Vegetables and Dead Game Frans Snyders (Flemish)  c.1635-1637

Still Life with Fruit, Vegetables and Dead Game
Frans Snyders (Flemish) 
c.1635-1637

  Still Life with Peaches & Jar  Unknown (Roman)  1st century AD

Still Life with Peaches & Jar
Unknown (Roman) 
1st century AD

  Breakfast Still Life  Willem van Aelst (Dutch)  1671

Breakfast Still Life
Willem van Aelst (Dutch) 
1671

  Still Life with Slice of Salmon  Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin (French)  c.1734

Still Life with Slice of Salmon
Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin (French) 
c.1734

  Still Life with Fruit and Toad  Hermenegildo Bustos (Mexican)  1874

Still Life with Fruit and Toad
Hermenegildo Bustos (Mexican) 
1874

  Still Life: Drawing Board, Pipe, Onions and Sealing Wax  Vincent van Gogh (Dutch)  1889

Still Life: Drawing Board, Pipe, Onions and Sealing Wax
Vincent van Gogh (Dutch) 
1889

  Still Life with Basket of Apples  Paul Cézanne (French)  1890-1894

Still Life with Basket of Apples
Paul Cézanne (French) 
1890-1894

  Still Life with Skate  Chaïm Soutine (Russian)  1923

Still Life with Skate
Chaïm Soutine (Russian) 
1923

  Campbell's Soup Cans  Andy Warhol (American)  1962

Campbell's Soup Cans
Andy Warhol (American) 
1962

  Eggs  William Bailey (American)  1966

Eggs
William Bailey (American) 
1966

  Columbian Still Life  Fernando Botero (Columbian)  1969

Columbian Still Life
Fernando Botero (Columbian) 
1969

  Cubist Still Life  Roy Lichtenstein (American)  1974

Cubist Still Life
Roy Lichtenstein (American) 
1974